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The Search for the Silent Frog

Posted by Jonathan Twining on Aug 15, 2016 11:20:37 AM

Have you ever been the first to discover something?  Seen something that few if any people have ever seen? Felt that tremendous burst of exhilaration as you realized you were part of something that has never been done before?  Finished first in a big race, or won a championship of some sort?

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Academics, Environmental Science, Biology

ENC Physics and Engineering – A New Brand Of Education

Posted by Dr. Pierre-Richard Cornely on Mar 22, 2016 1:00:00 PM

The United States is currently facing some very important decisions about the future of Higher Education. While we continue to hold the largest number of the best scientists in the world, the gap between these scientists and the next group of best US scientists has been steadily growing in the last 10 years.

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Topics: Physics and Engineering, ENC Faculty, Education, Academics, Engineering, Physics, Technology

Face-To-Face Learning; Why Is It Important?

Posted by ENC on Aug 25, 2015 1:30:00 PM

Over the years face-to-face has been the go to method for learning because it provides students with hands on experiences that apply to real life. It also gives students and teachers alike the opportunity to interact with and be accountable for each other. This is not to say that online learning has no value, but rather to point out the essentiality of face-to-face learning. 

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Education, Academics

Why Consider Teaching? Hear From Teachers

Posted by Lorne Ranstrom on Jul 21, 2015 2:00:00 PM

To return to a theme of why should one consider teaching as a career, there are a number of amenities that the profession offers. In previous posts things like the opportunity to influence the lives of students in positive ways was offered. Additionally, another significant benefit of teaching is the opportunity to work with like-minded adults, all pursuing the same goals of connecting and working with students. The chance to have an impact in society also offers teachers meaningful work. 

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Education

Teaching in the STEM Fields

Posted by Lorne Ranstrom on Jul 7, 2015 8:26:00 AM

Have you ever thought about entering the teaching profession, particularly in a discipline where there is a need for teachers? When thinking about entering the profession, many focus on a particular age of student with whom they would like to work such as 3rd graders or high school seniors. I often hear students become animated when talking about working with students. I also hear students who are considering entering the profession become animated when talking about a particular content area in which they have an interest. 

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Education, Academics

Thinking Outside the Box (Part 2)

Posted by Bill McCoy on Jun 18, 2015 2:00:00 PM

In Part 1 of this blog post, I talked about the necessity of cultivating a habit of "outside the box thinking" and how I experience that in my work as a historian. Such habits of thought are, I think, among the most valuable elements of the kind of education we pursue at Eastern Nazarene College.

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Topics: ENC Faculty, History, Academics

Thinking Outside the Box (Part 1)

Posted by Bill McCoy on Jun 16, 2015 2:00:00 PM

At the end of every academic year, it is our habit in the History Department to hold an end of the year Senior Banquet, when we celebrate the achievements of the past year and say our farewells to graduating seniors. Amidst the festivities, we usually pause for a few minutes of reflection we call “Thoughts from the Chair,” when the department chair offers a few words of reflection, inspiration, and/or challenge to those in attendance. 

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Academics

Exploring Costa Rica (And Encountering A Terciopelo) - Part 2

Posted by Jonathan Twining on Jun 11, 2015 2:00:00 PM

“Can you hear the dink frog in the vegetation over here?” I said to my colleague Dr. Darrin Grinder of Northwest Nazarene University. I went looking for this tiny frog that made such a loud, chirping call, but had no success. As I gave up, a thought went through my head … “Turn and look before you step”. As I turned, I gasped, for there before me was a large terciopelo (or fer-de-lance), one of the most venomous and dangerous snakes in Central America. She was about 5 feet long, and curled up on the path next to an enormous pile of brush. This was a snake I had longed to see (from a safe distance) since I started going to Costa Rica. I stood there admiring this beautiful animal until she finally decided she could no longer tolerate my presence, and moved off into the brush pile. The encounter was over. Or was it?

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Academics, Environmental Science

Exploring Costa Rica - Part 1

Posted by Jonathan Twining on Jun 9, 2015 2:00:00 PM

The alarm went off at 4 AM, and I scrambled to get together my video gear and eat breakfast. We were leaving at 4:30 AM to drive to the top of Cerro de la Muerte, the 4th highest peak in Costa Rica at 11,322 feet, to catch the sunrise. From there my colleagues, Dr. John Cossel and Dr. Leslie Hay of Northwest Nazarene University, and their 19 students would hike down to the Quetzal Education Research Center (QERC) through the cloud forest. We caught just a glimpse of the sunrise before the clouds moved into the valley below us, obscuring the sun’s rays.

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Academics, Environmental Science

Why Should We Help Amphibians?

Posted by Jonathan Twining on Feb 19, 2015 2:00:00 PM

Did you know that 2014 was designated by the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation as the Year of the Salamander? The purpose of this was to raise awareness of salamanders and improve salamander conservation, research, and education globally. Why go to all this effort to help an amphibian? Why do amphibians - frogs and salamanders - matter? Why should we care if amphibians go extinct?

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Topics: ENC Faculty, Academics